Day 3 - Thursday, March 28, 2019

Thursday, Mar 28

Keynote

 

Trust, Facts & Democracy: How Libraries Fit into the Biggest Issues of These Times

Thursday, March 28: 8:45 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

Our popular and knowledgeable speaker covers the latest Pew Research Center findings about the stresses on three pillars of modern life. He describes how the erosion of trust in institutions and people has affected the way facts are created and challenged, and how that affects people’s attitudes about the essence of democratic institutions and norms. Librarians are at the heart of this story. Join our entertaining and inspiring storyteller!

Speaker:

, Director, Internet, Science and Technology Research, Pew Research Center and Author of the book "Networked: The New Social Operating System"

 

Thursday, Mar 28

Track A: Content Management & Industry

Moderator:
Richard P. Hulser, President, Richard P. Hulser Consulting
 

A301. Library Publishing 2019

Thursday, March 28: 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

In recent years, librarians have been shouldering their way into a new digital publishing role that now includes academic and commercial ventures, upsetting the status quo in the industry at large. It is clear that our publishing mandate is here to stay and is well on its way to becoming a new core competency for the profession. Huwe posits that with a strong foundation in open scholarship as well as public service, we are already creating all-new digital strategies without the burden of long operational histories, mandates to make profits, or outmoded preconceptions that originated in print publishing. He compares library publishing ventures with the digital initiatives of legacy publishers, describing the values we share as well as the many ways in which we differ. We are a profession of collaborators, and new partnerships and alliances are open to us as we establish our publishing identity. Hear about the key strategic decisions we will make in the near future.

Speaker:

, Library Director (Emeritus), Institute for Research on Labor & Employment, University of California, USA

 

A302. Teaching Data Science With Sports & Gaming

Thursday, March 28: 11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The gaming revolution is here to stay. Recent studies show that 72% of U.S. teenagers play video games, and this continues into adulthood: The average gamer is 34 years old and 72% are 18 or older. The age of data science is also here to stay. In 2013, IBM assessed that 90% of the world’s data has been created in the past 2 years, but individuals who have strong data skills are lacking. Games provide the perfect learning platform due to a high level of engagement and repetition. When middle school students share why they enjoy gaming, the most common response is the autonomy games provide to improve their skill levels through repetitious action. The idea of learning games is certainly not new, although many traditional learning games are more often glorified quizzes that emphasize drilling information. Get tips and techniques on how to focus more on entertainment and creating meaningful experiences while incorporating learning into game mechanics and strategy.

Speaker:

, CEO, GameFlo LLC

 

A303. Collection Development: Strategies for Anticipating Needs

Thursday, March 28: 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Collection development is becoming an increasingly challenging task for libraries of all types today. Identifying relevant content and working with vendors, aggregators, platform providers, integrators, and resellers can lead to unintentional gaps, duplicate purchases, and incompatible solutions to the real requirements of end users. Huffine suggests strategies for solving some of these issues and working with a diverse community of providers to support your users’ needs where and when they look to you for information.

Speaker:

, Chief, Library and Public Information Center, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., Division of Administration

 

A304/A305. Connecting Libraries & Community Info Networks

Thursday, March 28: 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Public and academic libraries alike have a unique role to play in their local civic data ecosystems. Whether acting as community connectors, parsing hyperlocal applications for open datasets, or creating data tools of their own, libraries can function as both hubs and driving engines of civic-minded data activity. This double session features three different projects. Greenwalt provides an overview of the library role in open data partnerships as seen through the perspective of the Civic Switchboard Project— an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-supported effort geared toward catalyzing academic and public libraries as players in civic data ecosystems. Partnerships between libraries and local data intermediaries as a means to better serve data users, further democratize data, and support equitable access to information need to increase. Hear about the guide and toolkit being created to help libraries getting started in this work, and the stories from members already doing it around the country. Participants in another IMLS-funded national project, Community Webs: Empowering Public Librarians to Create Community History Web Archives, explore project management, professional development, and outreach in the context of preserving 50 terabytes of community web archives. Hear how the Internet Archive is training a national cohort how to web archive using Archive-It while creating an online curriculum for broader dissemination, and how several public libraries approached the technical, curatorial, and outreach challenges related to building special collections representative of their local communities.

Speakers:

, Virtual Services Coordinator, Skokie Public Library

, Digital Curation Librarian, DC Public Library

, Senior Reference Librarian, New Brunswick PL

, Local History Librarian, West Hartford Public Library

, Web Archivist, Internet Archive

, Principal, Lighthouse Consulting, Inc. and & Executive Director, Federation of Ontario Public Libraries (FOPL)

 

A304/A305. Connecting Libraries & Community Info Networks (continued)

Thursday, March 28: 3:45 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.

 

Thursday, Mar 28

Track B: Tech Tools

Moderator:
Hannah Sommers, Associate University Librarian, George Washington University
 

B301. Computers in Libraries Magazine’s Tech Forum

Thursday, March 28: 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

This panel of industry thought leaders and Computers in Libraries magazine columnists reflects on technology issues, libtech challenges, top trends and foreseeable developments affecting all libraries—public, academic, and special—museums, and archives. Bring your own issues and challenges to this sureto- be lively, interactive forum.

Speakers:

, Vice President of Content, Information Today

, Library Director (Emeritus), Institute for Research on Labor & Employment, University of California, USA

, Independent Consultant, Library Technology Guides

, Consulting Archivist/Researcher, Hyperclick Online Services

 

B302. There’s an App for That!

Thursday, March 28: 11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Looking for some new tech? Join this session for a brief introduction to 30 apps, software, and web tools in 60 minutes. We look at tools for graphic design, game development, information literacy, and more! Whether you’re looking for a tool to use in your own work or to introduce to your patrons, there is something for everyone.

Speaker:

, Digital Literacy Associate, Tulsa City-County Library

 

B303. Augmented & Virtual Reality in Libraries

Thursday, March 28: 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

In fall 2017, one community college developed a plan to transform library instruction with virtual and augmented reality. Pino and Buck share the journey up the mountain of faculty engagement, through the valley of resource assessment, and to the shores of instructional design and development. Fellow travelers gain new insight into this emerging technology, a list of vetted resources for academic engagement, and the inspiration to begin a program with just a few small steps at home.

Speakers:

, Catalog/Reference Librarian, Pellissippi State Community College

, Blount County Campus Librarian, Pellissippi State Community College

 

B304. Tech & ROI in Rural Libraries

Thursday, March 28: 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Learn how a public library has been able to increase rural branch use through incorporating new open+ technology at two of its rural branch locations. Combining technology and an innovative combination of local and remote staffing, access to branch library resources have increased from at least 17 to 60 hours per week thereby improving the library’s role as a community hub. Come and learn about the extended access service model, lessons learned and applied, the benefits of leveraging technology, and the outcomes from first location in Canada to implement this technology.

Speakers:

, Director, Digital Technology & Communication, Hamilton Public Library

, Manager of Digital Technology Infrastructure, Hamilton Public Library

, Director, Public Services, Branches, Hamilton Public Library

 

B305. Educational Tips, Apps, & More

Thursday, March 28: 3:45 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Hill discusses iThink Tech Savvy, an interactive exploration technology application workshop that provides librarians, teachers, and educators with information about the latest free and cost-friendly apps like Photomath, Evernote, StudyBlue, and various others. These apps can be useful in the classroom, library, for fun, or as assistance to teens and tweens for homework and assignments. Vincent, a former computer teacher, shares tips for teaching tech to others. Bring your tablets, iPads, or phone to join this interactive learning session.

Speakers:

, Teen Librarian, Durham County Library

, Library Consultant, Technology & Innovation, Utah State Library Division

 

Thursday, Mar 28

Track C: Marketing & Engaging Communities

Moderator:
Ben Bizzle, Founder & CEO, Library Market
 

C301. Engaging With Impact Stories

Thursday, March 28: 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Working in a library can be tough, rewarding, and inspiring. We all need a little reminder of our impact and value every now and then to help us keep moving forward with our good work. In anticipation of their new book, It’s All About the Story, please join our popular and experienced speakers in an interactive storytelling session about the impact libraries have on the lives of the people we serve. They share stories from their book and invite you to share your inspirational library stories as well.

Speakers:

, former Executive Director, Fayetteville Free Library (FFL) and Strategic Doing Consulting, CEO

, Founder & CEO, Library Market

 

C302. Strategic Thinking for the Rest of Us

Thursday, March 28: 11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Good strategy focuses on putting together a coherent set of ideas, actions or behaviors that enable you—or your organization—to create a unique position in the marketplace. Most organizations assign strategic thinking to senior leaders, but what if it was as simple as asking questions like: Where are we now? Where should we be? How will we get there? What will be different? How will we know we were successful? In this talk, our facilitator proposes a flexible model for strategic thinking that can work in a variety of strategic scenarios. Get tips for using the model grow strategic thinking in your organization.

Speaker:

, Associate University Librarian, Academic (Acting), McLaughlin Library, University of Guelph

 

C303. Preparing Libraries for the Digital Future

Thursday, March 28: 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

As the world continues to move toward a digital economy, libraries play a vital role in preparing communities for the opportunities and challenges ahead. Libraries offer patrons a space to access free Wi-Fi, learn coding and other digital skills, and gain experience with emerging technologies through new library programming; all of which require a strong network infrastructure and fast Wi-Fi connectivity. Velikonja discusses how Google searches may yield surprises about patron needs. He shares how he used Google’s API with themed key phrases in 3,000 library service areas and the results confirmed some assumptions and brought some new ideas forward. Use this info to inform your marketing efforts and help your administrators with resource management and planning. Sutherland discusses how libraries nationwide can meet patron needs by leveraging E-rate Category 2 funding to purchase necessary equipment and related services. She takes an in-depth look at a few library systems that have implemented new Wi-Fi infrastructures using E-rate funding and the programs that were improved upon with the technology upgrades. Though established in 1996 to ensure that schools and libraries have the resources necessary to upgrade their network infrastructures, most of the E-rate funding still goes to schools. In 2016, libraries were awarded just under $75M of the more than $1.6B committed. Get strategies to help your library overcome obstacles such as limited IT support, establishing and maintaining CIPA compliance, creating timelines that enable board approvals, and identifying matching funds.

Speakers:

, Head, Research, Koios LLC

, President & CEO, EdTechnologyFunds, Inc.

 

C304. Spaces, Final Frontier?

Thursday, March 28: 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

I don’t want to use my creative energy on somebody else’s user interface. Jeff Bezos’ booking study rooms online is a highly valued and utilized service at our library. LibCal’s room booking software was instrumental in that success. When planning to move to the new Spaces, we surveyed our students. The students expressed how they greatly valued the service and offered features they would like to see added. Spaces’ new API gave us the freedom to develop a highly customized interface/ app to enhance student experience by incorporating their suggestions. We are developing apps and a web interface to include a number of features not found in Space’s interface: VR views of the rooms, notification of room reservation to multiple students, simplified interface, and searching available rooms by time, date, size, and equipment. The application is being developed to allow other libraries to download and customize the application. Come learn about our progress and discover how to use our tools at your library.

Speakers:

, Associate Professor, Digital Library Services, Digital Resources and Discovery Services, Oklahoma State University Libraries

, Research Professionals, Oklahoma State University Libraries

, Research Professionals, Oklahoma State University Libraries

 

C305. Engaging & Delighting Global Communities

Thursday, March 28: 3:45 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Get an overview on how the Worldwide American Libraries of the 1990s transformed to the current, vibrant, 650-plus American Spaces (AS) in 141 countries and delighted nearly 58 million visitors in 2017. Through the sharing of Bhatnagar’s personal work in 27 countries managing 125 AS, learn what it took to envision, develop, and execute outcome-based programming to engage the strategically determined communities using physical and, more importantly, digital platforms to maximize reach. Citing best practice from a transformed American Space in Kenya, learn how using “digital hub and spoke system,” continuous tracking program outcomes through data analysis, utilizing customer survey methodologies, and focus group feedbacks resulted in improved quality, quantity, and visibility of AS programs, leading to a recorded 430% rise in the number of programs in 2016, with visitor count in other AS across Kenya tripling.

Speaker:

, Retired Regional Engagement Specialist/Diplomat, Department of State

 

Thursday, Mar 28

Track D: Management & Metrics

Moderator:
Rebecca Jones, Managing Partner, Dysart & Jones Associates
 

D301. Outcome-Driven Innovation

Thursday, March 28: 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Nonprofits are becoming increasingly sophisticated in datadriven decision making and service planning. How can the social sector adopt outcome-drive or “needs first” innovation into their strategy? Follow a simple case study of how a public library can leverage front-line staff experience to meet community needs with measurable outcomes in their strategic plan.

Speaker:

, Public Services Project Manager, Sno-Isle Libraries

 

D302. Tech Tools to Transform Culture

Thursday, March 28: 11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

Experts say that culture change takes 8 years to achieve. Yet, in this fast-paced world, organizations do not have the luxury to spend 8 years engaged in the processes of shifting culture. Libraries in particular are not able to spend that kind of time due to the innovative and energetic pace of changes in the profession and their need to keep current in order to remain relevant. Find out how the library at Montgomery College, the largest community college in Maryland, continues to make incremental changes to combat the 8-year myth. By challenging employees to make small improvements, the library system was able to encourage the transformation of traditional library services. Utilizing diverse technology tools, a number of large initiatives are being realized within a 3-year period of time, including launching a single service point, creating consistent student employee training and onboarding, and establishing library employee competencies in the areas of information seeking, access services, and technology use. This presentation provides a road map and best practices for implementing transformative changes in your library’s culture.

Speakers:

, Health Sciences & Faculty Services Librarian, Montgomery College

, Campus Library Manager, Montgomery College

 

D303. Successful Strategies for Results: Ideas to Implementation

Thursday, March 28: 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Regardless of rank or role, all staff members may identify innovations that can improve workflows, services, and resource offerings. But how does a good idea find its way to consideration and implementation? This talk explores how ideas are born and what challenges can impede their development. It cites real-world examples of organizations successfully mitigating these challenges so that ideas are shared, heard, considered, approved, developed, and implemented. Based on the assumption that good ideas can come from anywhere within an organization and the realization that success requires participation, collaboration, and buy-in on many levels, this innovation process is addressed through the perspective of multiple organizational roles. Participants come away with practical strategies on how to successfully encourage, contribute to, cultivate, implement, and innovate solutions and improvements.

Speaker:

, Director, Library & Learning Resource Services, North Shore Community College

 

D304. Evaluation Matrix: Bibliometrics for Collection Development

Thursday, March 28: 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Data is invaluable in streamlining the potentially arduous task of selecting materials for acquisition but is too often limited to usage statistics and cost per use. Examining usage, along with cost-per-use metrics and interlibrary loan statistics, citation rates, and publication metrics, provides a more complete picture of the value of individual titles and our collection as a whole. Staff have developed a methodology to analyze the data from the library’s metrics and bibliometrics programs that gives insight into how patrons use materials and the impact of those materials. The resulting analysis identifies relevant and emerging research areas and is used to build an evaluation matrix that informs decisions for collection development.

Speaker:

, Senior Bibliometrics Librarian, LAC Group, NOAA Central Library

 

D305. Hiring & Growing the Best People

Thursday, March 28: 3:45 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Is the pool drying up just when you need to hire the best? Need some tips on hiring the best even when they aren’t applying for the job? When is the last time you overhauled your hiring process? Is your applicant pool diminishing while your needs are expanding? Join this session to ponder why that is, come up with a game plan for rethinking your approach, and leave with a list of action steps from recruitment to interview techniques to on-boarding. Also consider your job description and the phrase “and other duties as assigned,” which can be seen as an opportunity, not a burden. Kowalski discusses how to best use the flexibility of your position to both help your institution and your own career, how to develop passion projects, grow your skill set, and explore opportunities beyond your job description while maintaining productivity and standards.

Speakers:

, Maxine Bleiweis & Associates and Former Public Library Director

, Outreach & Reference Librarian, University of the District of Columbia

 

Thursday, Mar 28

Track E: Smart Communities & Blockchain

Moderator:
Donna Scheeder, Library Strategies International
 

E301/E302. Smart Communities & Libraries

Thursday, March 28: 10:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

The Smart City phenomenon has gained momentum in regions, cities, and neighborhoods all over the world. Public and private entities are working together and navigating emerging opportunities that are now available with increased technological capabilities, hoping to make their communities both safe and efficient for citizens and the environment. Hear how public libraries are part of their City’s Smart City initiatives, how one academic library is designing a smart campus, and how the Smart City agenda is an opportunity for libraries to add value and raise their profile as leaders in digital inclusion and digital literacy.

Speakers:

, City Librarian, Toronto Public Library

, CEO/Founder, SolveOS

 

E303. Will IoT & Our Citizens Make Our Communities Smarter?

Thursday, March 28: 1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

The Internet of Things including smart sensors for firefighters, Tai Kwon Do students, medical patients, citizen scientists and libraries is growing. Here from speakers who weigh in on our future as smart communities and share their thoughts of how libraries can be front and center in the process!

Speakers:

, CEO/Founder, SolveOS

, Program Scientist, SMD/Heliophysics, NASA HQ & Geospace Physics Laboratory, NASA Goddard

 

E304/E305. Blockchain & Opportunities for Libraries

Thursday, March 28: 2:45 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Libraries are just beginning to explore blockchain, the technology behind cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. But the opportunities for libraries go beyond digital money. Blockchain is being explored as the backbone of a more free and open internet, as well as a means for authentication and for privacy and security. This mini-workshop discusses the possibilities for blockchain technology, including smart contracts, illustrates various ways the technology is being used today, and explores how libraries might apply blockchain to deal with intellectual property, scholarly publishing, and copying as well as managing users, ensuring patron privacy, expanding collections beyond our walls, and even helping to build the internet of the future. It shares research being done at San Jose State University along with their top picks for using this technology in and for libraries.

Speakers:

, Founder & Principal Consultant, Evenly Distributed LLC and Affiliate - MetaLab @ Harvard

, Digital Initiatives Manager, Palo Alto City Library

, Lecturer, School of Information, San Jose State University

 

E304/E305. Blockchain & Opportunities for Libraries (continued)

Thursday, March 28: 3:45 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

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