March 28-30 preconference workshops March 27 hyatt regency crystal city
arlington, va


Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Keynote

Continental Breakfast

8:00 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.

Upping Our Game

8:45 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.
Patricia Martin, CEO, Litlamp Communications & Author, Renaissance Generation: The Rise of the Cultural Consumer and What It Means to Your Business

In her research on the digital culture, author Patricia Martin defines the top priorities essential to a successful transformation for libraries looking to thrive in the 21st century. Surprising and sometimes seismic, she explores the shifts that are about to rock the culture and how libraries can emerge even stronger.

Track A - Analyzing Collections

This track focuses on one of our library’s largest assets—collections and how to analyze them, copyright and licensing, linked authority data and open framework, resources, and practices.

Moderator: Amy Affelt, Director, Database Research Worldwide, Compass Lexecon Author, The Accidental Data Scientist: Big Data Applications & Opportunities for Librarians & Information Professionals

Coffee Break - Exhibit Hall Opens

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

A201: Analyzing Collections

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Lutgarda Barnachea, Coordinator for Technical Services, University of Maryland
Diana Plunkett, Manager, Strategic Initiatives, Brooklyn Public Library
Angie Miraflor, Director, Customer Experience, Brooklyn Public Library

The University of Maryland Libraries–College Park is undertaking a massive collection analysis to identify the strengths of its various collections, to comprehensively analyze the use of its print collections with the goal of identifying items that could be moved to an off-site location, and to reduce the footprint of the print collections. Their assessment coordinator discusses using their library system (Aleph) and the OCLC WorldShare Management System’s collection analysis capability. She focuses on the kinds of information and data generated to support the collection analysis performed by subject librarians as part of their data-driven decision making. Librarians from the Brooklyn Public Library share their collection analysis experience using Collection HQ and Tableau to generate data to drive decision-making.

A202: LC Linked Authority Data

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Qi Tong, Linked Authority Data, Library of Congress

Library of Congress Linked Data Service (id.loc.gov) provides access to commonly found standards and vocabularies using semantic web technology. Since its inception in 2009, the LC has published many popular vocabularies in linked data formats such as Subject Headings (LCSH), Name Authority File (NAF), and Demographic Group Terms (LCDGT). New data elements are continuously added to the published vocabularies, such as Real World Object (ROW) elements for Names and Subjects and ISIL code for Cultural Heritage Organizations. This talk gives a brief update on the Linked Data Service and the challenges it faces, including data modeling and technology platform.

Lunch Break

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

A203: Copyright & Licensing

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Stephen Marvin, Campus Copyright & Reference Coordinator, West Chester University
Mike Gruenberg, President, Gruenberg Consulting LLC Information Industry Executive and Author, "Buying and Selling Information: A Guide For Information Professionals and Sales people To Build Mutual Success"

So often, with the release of special content, after the metadata, web design, and intuitive searching structure has been developed, the question of copyright halts progress. What efforts are needed to acquire permissions, post research to an institutional repository, and sack the internet for images for another website? The digital world is bending to accept more exceptions! Explore and share some cases which help and hinder efforts to provide access, unfettered by copyright constraints, by planning in advance. Then hear Gruenberg explore the “process of buying and selling” information. He shares tips for info pros as they prepare for meetings with the vendors; discusses how both sides can come away with a win-win result; and illustrates with real-life examples.

Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

A204/205: Open: Framework, Resources, & Practices

3:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Robert F Loftus, Systems Librarian, Baldwinsville Public Library
David Green, Library Systems Manager, Chapel Hill Public Library
Joyce Valenza, Professor, Rutgers SC&I
Michelle Luhtala, Library Department Chair, New Canaan High School, Westport, Conn.

Loftus presents a framework for identifying the types of information used in your library and selecting open access digital resources to suit user needs. He discusses the “different meanings of free” and shares how to download instructions to create a children’s computer game using open software. Green discusses using collaborative innovation techniques to create a city’s open data program at the public library. Chapel Hill Open Data increases transparency and facilitates access to information. The library leads the planning, design, and implementation of the service, which advances the town council’s goal of increasing civic understanding. This role in leading innovation is one that other libraries can take. Hear about the benefits and challenges of the collaborative innovation techniques of associating, questioning, observing, networking, and experimenting used to achieve outcome goals. The last presentation looks at what we point to and make discoverable. Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that may be freely used and reused at no cost. The U.S. Department of Education’s #GoOpen campaign seeks to make a bounty of OER available to all educators. It is critical that librarians find a seat at the #GoOpen table. Librarians have always been about selecting, organizing, ensuring access and equity, sense-making, adding value, instructional voice, storytelling, personalizing, and learning. Speakers consider strategies for curating OER, how to select and curate instructional content to add local instructional value, how to ensure valuable existing purchases are utilized along with the free content, how to work with teachers to understand the Creative Commons licensing behind the resources, and more.

Track B - Management & Metrics

Using business strategies and techniques can really assist libraries in making an impact in their communities. This track looks at the use of content and information management to create targeted products, the Wardley Value Chain Mapping—an innovative IT planning process, finding a social media voice, mining chat, and dealing with changing roles and models.

Moderator: Jeff Wisniewski, Web Services Librarian, University of Pittsburgh

Coffee Break - Exhibit Hall Opens

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

B201: Enabling Libraries to Use Their Smarts!

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Melissa Shaffer, Director of Information Management Services, Harvard Business School

Getting library products in front of our communities in a personalized, flexible ecosystem is the name of the game today. Shaffer shares how the Baker Library uses a content management system (CMS) middle layer with curated, reusable content objects and information management practices to build information products targeted to users, resulting in continually highly curated, frequently updated, dynamically created research and course support guides. In addition, the library uses information management techniques (metadata and taxonomy design, entity management, analytics, and query analysis) and inhouse search engineers to inform the search engine configuration and create a search disambiguation dialogue with searchers, resulting in new ways to connect users and their queries to the best content. Get some inspiring insights and ideas from our speaker.

B202: Managing Tech & Innovation

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Jen Baum Sevec, Senior Metadata and Acquisitions Librarian, Library Of Congress
Brett Williams, Systems & Liaison Librarian, University of Toronto Mississauga

Sevec offers leaders at any level the opportunity to up their game by learning current management strategies for technology and innovation. Library leaders and constituents engage in the nearly constant interplay of enabling technology and innovations to explore a wealth of information and greater depth of data in the Information Age. A framework for managing this interplay is provided as well as an understanding of the dynamic lifecycle inherent in technological innovations and constituent demands. Williams provides an introduction to Wardley Value Chain Mapping, an innovative IT planning processes discussed by Simon Wardley on his blog Bits and Pieces. He shares specific examples of how this tool can be used by systems librarians, library administrators, and library IT decision makers.

Lunch Break

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

B203: Finding Your Social Media Voice

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Meghan Kowalski, Head, Preservation, The Catholic University of America
Kirsten Mentzer, Technology Specialist, Northern Virginia Community College’s Medical Education Campus
Alexandra Radocchia Zealand, Web Editor, New Media Developer and Video Producer, Web Team, Arlington Public Library PLA, VLA, ALA, LLAMA
Lennea R. Bower, Manager, Virtual Services, Montgomery County Public Libraries

This session provides an in-depth look at how to speak in social media. Each institution and organization’s social media accounts has a personality. How you say something is just as important as what you say and why you say it. Your voice on social media says a lot to your followers. If done well, your tone will help to attract and keep an audience. The wrong kind of voice will turn people away. Finding the right voice can be difficult and involves a lot of trial and error. Speakers provide tips for finding the right voice and presenting the best personality for your intended followers. Social media is no longer the “new kid on the block,” and the panel highlights the best ways to communicate content, being real, tone, and more. They showcase what kinds of tones can be used and how to find the “real voice” for your accounts, why those voices are (or are not) successful for those accounts; and how to make your chosen voice sustainable and consistent across your accounts.

Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

B204: Changing Models/Roles: Competencies & PD

3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Kim Huntley, Manager, North York Central Library
Heather Mathis, Manager, Learning, Innovation & Resource Planning, Toronto Public Library

Based on work done over the last 3 years, TPL tackles the evolving nature of librarianship in a changing service environment. Libraries everywhere are responding to users’ changing interests and new ways of sharing information. The Role of the Librarian initiative creates opportunities for librarians to maximize the use of their professional skills. Get the details about new models for service delivery, learn about capacity building through a mandatory professional development program, and hear the top competencies for 21st-century librarians.

B205: Mining Chat & Learning New Skills for Management

4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
John Kimbrough, Electronic Resources Librarian, Georgetown University Library
Mark Winek, Head, Electronic Resources & Serials, Georgetown University Library
Nancy Howe, Public Relations/Outreach Librarian, Baldwinsville Public Library

What do your patrons find frustrating about navigating your library databases? Transcripts from online chat services can be a rich lode of data about patron “pain points” when using electronic resources. Hear how one library mined this data for better communication with resource providers, improved processing workflows of electronic resources, and targeted collaboration with public services staff. Howe discusses how, in 2015, the Baldwinsville Public Library was approached by village and town officials to help with the creation of a community calendar. The library became the lead agency on the project. The librarian quickly acquired many new skills including how to collaborate with agencies (all with somewhat different priorities); how to write a Request for Proposal for a multi-agency project; and how to get an inter-agency cooperative agreement for payment of the project (and on-going maintenance). Howe shares tips for spearheading a project that goes beyond the four walls of the library.

Track C - Enterprises: Tools, Tech, & Special Collections

This track emphasizes exciting ways to engage clients within government and other types of enterprises, including using Pokémon GO, knowledge management, special collections, and technology.

Moderator: Kimberly Silk, Special Projects Officer, Canadian Research Knowledge Network

Coffee Break - Exhibit Hall Opens

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

C201: Pokémon GO Changed Our Library!

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Amanda Costigan, Library Director, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Brittany Ham, Librarian, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)
Rachel Seissler, Catalog Librarian, Federal Communications Commission (FCC)

How can a special or government library promote its role in the organization, have fun, and still maintain an essential sense of professionalism? This session shows how embracing a sense of fun can yield both short- and longterm benefits both for the library and the community that it serves. When the Pokémon GO game was launched in July 2016, the FCC Library quickly discovered that a nearby PokéStop, where players can stop and collect in-game items, was named for the FCC Library itself. Rather than ignoring this as a fad just for kids, the library embraced its PokéStop status and created an interactive marketing campaign based around the game. Not only was there an increase in library traffic, but several other teams approached the library for future collaboration. Since then, the FCC Library has planned and implemented several successful marketing campaigns, including a relaxation area in the library with rotating activities. The success of these campaigns have stemmed from eye-catching imagery, enthusiastic and knowledgeable staff, consistent branding, and a sense of fun. While some public libraries have long embraced these techniques, they are still unusual to see in special or government libraries. Hear about the FCC Library marketing successes, pitfalls, and how libraries can loosen up to attract users without losing sight of their goals.

C202: KM Toolkit

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Valeria Hunter, Principal Consultant, Hunter Knowledge & Insights, LLC

This session shares a KM toolkit focusing on tools and processes considered best practice based on the assessed knowledge capability gap. Tools and processes for explicit and tacit knowledge sharing and transfer are included. Hunter discusses how these tools are applicable to the library environment and emphasizes processes that result in innovative products and services through harnessing the value from a networked community of practice. She shows current examples and screenshots of services and products used by both libraries and nonprofit organizations. Attendees interested in innovative practices, partnerships, and collaboration are sure to receive value from this session.

Lunch Break

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

C203: ILS Migration & Developing With Drupal

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
June Yang, Senior Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Linda Venable, Systems Librarian, International Monetary Fund
Elizabeth Zoby, Information Specialist, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Billy Mathews, Web Developer, PAE, National Institute of Corrections (NIC)

Migrating to a new ILS system is not easy, and it is even more challenging when faced with a very tight deadline. Presenters share the recent experience of migrating from SirsiDynix Symphony to Alma within 5 months: what worked, what didn’t, lessons learned, and what to prepare in advance of the migration. They also share some insight about post migration work related to data cleanup, workflows review, etc. Zoby and Mathews share their development of the NIC micro-sites using Drupal, an open-source content management software, to create dynamic websites that make accessing material easy and user-friendly. Instead of having to download and shift through large PDF documents, users can access the content on easily searchable websites which can be edited by authorized users. See how the NIC Information Center is using these sites to help customers and the public access information in innovative ways.

Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

C204/205: Rev Your Engines: Digitization & Social Media of Specialized Collections

3:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Mark Vargas, Director, Library & Archives, The Revs Institute
Jessica Bright, Digital Library Coordinator, The Revs Institute
Camille Salas, Product Owner/Digital Archivist, Research, Archives & Data Strategy, National Public Radio (NPR)
Will Boyd, Full Stack Developer, National Public Radio (NPR)
Sarah Knight, Taxonomist, National Public Radio (NPR)
Ashley Augustyniak, Reference Librarian, The Donald F. & Mildred Topp Othmer Library of Chemical History, Chemical Heritage Foundation
Victoria Orzechowski, Librarian, The Donald F. & Mildred Topp Othmer Library of Chemical History, Chemical Heritage Foundation

One of the largest online photograph collections in the world is available through the Revs Institute for Automotive Research. Revs is the premier destination to study and explore one of the most comprehensive archives of automotive history ever preserved for scholars and connoisseurs alike. Hear how, in collaboration with Pixel Acuity and Stanford University, Revs digitizes and makes available more than 15,000 images per month (420,000 currently available with 600,000 more to go). The second presentation features NPR’s Research, Archives and Data Strategy team (NPR RAD) who overhauled and relaunched Artemis, NPR’s digital archive for broadcast and born-digital content. Working with limited resources and time, they built a new internally-facing app emphasizing speed and versatility with a sleek interface and user-centered features. The result is an innovative archival platform with extensible architecture and enhanced UX. Speakers discuss where they are now, the challenges faced and envisioned and share lessons learned. Our third presentation addresses how to enhance the discoverability, accessibility, and use of special collection materials in an increasingly digital world. It shares how special collections can be “unlocked” and promoted in such a way that the interest and enthusiasm of not only scholars, but a broad audience of users is piqued. Enter social media. Learn about the efforts of a small research library in Philadelphia to utilize social media to promote its special collections and increase user engagement/support for the library’s materials and services. Hear about the development, maintenance, and evaluation of its Tumblr and Pinterest accounts as well as the use of their parent organization’s Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Track D - Funding Strategies & Practices for Libraries

With budgets shrinking, libraries are looking for other funding sources. This is our first day-long look at finding funds, understanding what funding and grant agencies are looking for in successful recipients, crowdfunding tips and practices, as well as tips for academic libraries in philanthropic circles.

Moderator: Donna Scheeder, Library Strategies International President, International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA)

Coffee Break - Exhibit Hall Opens

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

D201: Finding Funds for Libraries: Visualizing

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Kate Tkacik, Manager, Funding Information Network, Foundation Center Knight Foundation News Challenge Grant Recipient

Visualizing Funding for Libraries, a Knight Foundation News Challenge winning project, enables library professionals and supporters to search for institutional funding for libraries at the national, state, and local levels. Data visualizations such as maps, network constellations, and partnership pathways showcase key networks of funders and recipients as well as individual grants which highlight what library services and programs are winning grants. Tkacik introduces participants to this dynamic and freely available mapping tool, provides pro tips on navigating the tool, and outlines next steps on how to pursue new funding opportunities.

D202: Funding Opps for Digital Library Initiatives

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Trevor Owens, Digital Archivist, Office of Strategic Initiatives, Library Of Congress
Nicole Ferraiolo, Program Officer, Scholarly Resources, Council on Library & Information Resources
Joel Wurl, Senior Program Officer, National Endowment for the Humanities

Discovering and deciphering guidelines for grant programs is a daunting and challenging process. This session provides an opportunity to directly hear from and ask questions about grant opportunities for digital libraries’ initiatives to program officers from different government and private funders. Following brief overviews of the relevant funding opportunities at their organizations, panelists discuss the kinds of projects that best fit their specific programs. Get suggestions on how to develop a competitive proposal and insights on the application and review process. Panelists consider themes and trends from the digital library projects that have received funding, such as digitization, open educational resources, linked data, crowdsourcing, open access publishing, emulation and virtualization, and data visualization. By bringing together representatives from different funders, this session offers a unique opportunity to connect directly with program officers and identify new opportunities and approaches for funding.

Lunch Break

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

D203: Growing Philanthropic Dollars for Libraries

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Kathryn Dilworth, Director, Advancement for Libraries & Press, Purdue Research Foundation Author, Fundraising for the Academic Library: Philanthropy in Higher Education
Laura Sloop Henzl, Director, Foundation Relations, Purdue Research Foundation Author, Fundraising for the Academic Library: Philanthropy in Higher Education

This session discusses the importance of collaborating with colleagues across campus and communities and how to work closely with fundraising professionals to leverage the work of library professionals to increase philanthropic dollars. It shares a variety of cases and also reviews the standard mechanisms for giving. Library professionals can and should take a lead role in the task of fundraising, not only to further disseminate their research and increase knowledge of the library, but should also create collaborative projects with greater expertise and impact that reach beyond the library. Speakers look at the potential for the library to be the environment in the community, campus, or sector that is best positioned to nurture, celebrate, and promote philanthropy.

Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

D204: Crowdfunding Tips & Tools

3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Nancy Herther, Librarian, University of Minnesota

This session provides an overview of how libraries and researchers are using crowdfunding to fundraise in new and exciting ways. It looks at the tools and platforms used by colleges, shares details and library practices with Kickstarter, and illustrates how to grab the attention and funds from your local community. Herther provides the steps you need to enter the new era of fundraising in your community, especially within higher education.

D205: Crowdfunding a Library Makerspace

4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Jonathan Amey, Youth Services Librarian, Gloucester County Library System - Glassboro Branch
Ralph Bingham, Head, Reference & Digital Services, Gloucester County Library System - Mullica Hill Branch

In March 2016, the Friends of the Gloucester County Library System in Gloucester County, N.J., launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise money for the creation of a public makerspace at the Glassboro Branch Library. The small, walking community of Glassboro responded by donating more than $5,000 toward the campaign, making it possible to purchase 3D printers, virtual reality headsets, and some amazing STEM tools and toys. Speakers and campaign coordinators, share secrets for utilizing this innovative means to raise money and develop community partnerships, proper budgeting and planning for similar projects, and some tips and tricks on how to save time and money on technology.

Track E - Internet@Schools

For Day 2, K–12-focused Internet@Schools track, the focus is on game design, National Archives resources, a collaborative digital curriculum project, crowd-sourcing bibliographies, and fostering research skills.

Moderators:
David Hoffman, Co-Chair for the Internet@Schools Track, Information Today, Inc.
Carolyn Foote, Librarian/ District Librarian, Westlake High School/ Eanes ISD

Coffee Break - Exhibit Hall Opens

9:45 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

E201: Game Design as a Catalyst for Learning

10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Tracey Wong, School Library Media Specialist, Highview School, Hartsdale, N.Y.
Stony Evans, Library Media Specialist, Lakeside High School, Hot Springs, Ark.

By offering game design as a catalyst for learning, educators can take learning to the next level. Students explore their interests, passions, and curiosities as they become creative, innovative, and practice thinking outside of the box. Come learn to use game design to create transdisciplinary learning opportunities that give students a voice.

E202: Getting Your Hands on History: How Teachers & Students Are Unlocking Records of the National Archives

11:45 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
Suzanne Isaacs, Community Manager, National Archives Catalog, National Archives and Records Adminstration
Meredith Doviak, National Archives and Records Adminstration

Get an overview and demonstrations of crowdsourcing projects that teachers and students can get involved with to increase online access to the National Archive’s historical records. The presenters cover the Innovation Hub citizen scanning efforts, along with online activities in tagging, transcription, and on Wikipedia projects. The session also highlights some of the student projects that have been accomplished as part of these efforts.

Lunch Break

12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.

E203: The Social Studies & Library Digital Curriculum Project

1:45 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Emily Strong, Head Librarian, South County High School, Fairfax County Public Schools, Lorton, Va.
Michael Cieslak, Education Specialist - 24/7 Learning, Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, Va.
Mary Catherine Keating, World History and Geography Teacher, Chantilly High School, Chantilly, Va.

In this session, presenters share and discuss a long-term curriculum project developing blended learning unit plans for high school social studies curriculum that leverages library and web resources. The goal of the Social Studies & Library Digital Curriculum Project is to expand the teaching and learning ecosystem for the 21st-century learner. The project entails implementing a blended learning environment in the classroom and utilizing learner-centered teaching strategies to enhance the time, place, path, and pace of student learning. This is a joint collaborative project between social studies teachers and librarians.

Coffee Break in the Exhibit Hall

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
sponsored by

Featuring leading-edge companies, the exhibition offers visitors a choice of products in all aspects of library technology, including web-based products and services, integrated library and information systems, online services, document delivery services, and more.

E204: Collective Intelligence: Crowd-Sourcing, Annotated Bibliographies, & the Internet

3:30 p.m. - 4:15 p.m.
Robert Nelson, School Media Specialist/G Suite Coordinator,, Fort Hamilton High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.
Randy Kaminsky, Social Studies Teacher, Fort Hamilton High School, Brooklyn, N.Y.

This session seeks to assist education professionals in developing a plan to use Google’s G Suite or similar tools to create assignments around the principle of a “crowdsourced annotated bibliography.” A crowdsourced annotated bibliography is an online tool created by students for use in research projects. Groups of students conduct searches of the available online databases and post their annotations. Those annotations are then added to by other students who utilize the articles in their own research. The end result is a living annotated bibliography that is constantly expanding and evolving. This session provides fun and practical assistance on how to begin, assess, and grow similar resources using free tools available online.

E205: The Role of the Library in Fostering Research Skills

4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.
Margaux DelGuidice-Calemmo, Teacher-Librarian, Garden City High School, Garden City, N.Y.

Learn how school librarians can use their information literacy training to help implement a mandate for research across all curriculum areas and grade levels. The end goal is not only to make students “college and career ready,” but to make research an innate process that engages students, helping them to take ownership of their learning. The basic tenants and principals are discussed and expanded upon with Margaux providing hands-on tips and tools for attendees looking to implement, or expand, a research program.

Library Leaders Summit

The future is a concern for any organization, but many spend very little time considering it. The flames of the day-to-day fires are too strong to step away and think about the big picture and libraries’ roles and positioning in an ever-changing technical and social world where the sheer volume of information inundates us every day. Take time, listen to industry leaders, discuss the big issues with colleagues, and leave with some new ideas and insights for future proofing your library.

Library Leaders Summit is a separately priced event at Computers in Libraries 2017 and is produced in conjunction with Dysart & Jones Assocates and the Special Libraries Assocation (SLA).

Coffee with Summit Colleagues

9:45 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Technology & the Future

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Leif Pedersen, CTO, Innovative

The panel shares their insights about the future and discusses the key areas for libraries to focus their attention. They also participate in an interactive discussion with the audience. Bring your tech concerns and discuss them with colleagues and experts.

Prickly Topics

11:15 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

This session looks at the elephants on the table and other prickly topics that we like to avoid facing, and therefore solving. Be ready to have an honest conversation and feel uncomfortable, but also to get some insights for addressing tough issues and decisions.

Lunch & Communications Roundtable

12:30 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Patricia Martin, CEO, Litlamp Communications & Author, Renaissance Generation: The Rise of the Cultural Consumer and What It Means to Your Business

Go one-on-one with morning keynote, Patricia Martin, CEO, Litlamp Communications.

Change Management

1:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Michael Edson, Associate Director & Head, Digital, United Nations Live, Museum for Humanity

Change is hard—how can we do it better? Learn from a long-time practitioner in the museum and tech industries who shares models, strategies and recommendations for creating dynamic organizations that can deal with, and master, change. Be inspired and take home solid ideas for moving your organization forward and engaging its community.

Coffee with Summit Colleagues

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

Distinctive Positioning for the Future

3:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Amy Burke, Executive Director, SLA
Linda Hazzan, Director, Communications, Programming, & Customer Engagement, Toronto Pubic Library

This session looks at how libraries can distinguish themselves from other community activities and services, how they can partner with some of those other community groups and still keep their distinctiveness, and more. Think about where the learning commons ends and the library starts and how they interact; where the museum ends and the library starts; how public libraries can share programs with the zoo; how academic libraries can draw their non-academic communities in for support; and more.

Wrap-Up

4:30 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.

Wednesday Evening Session

ReImagining Libraries: Open Ecosystems

7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
Moderator: Marshall Breeding, Independent Consultant, Library Technology Guides
Erik Boekesteijn, Global Library Motivator, Library Bureau of Innovation
Michael Winkler, Open Library Environment
Jack Ammerman, Boston University
Dr. Frank Cervone, Executive Director of Information Technology, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago Lecturer, San Jose State University
K. Jane Burpee, Digital Initiatives, McGill University

To best support diverse challenges, the core technology infrastructure of libraries must be open and flexible. Libraries no longer tolerate closed systems unable to foster innovation. No system can be expected to function ideally for all types of libraries. Instead, the core systems must be open in ways that allow libraries to connect them with a diverse set of other applications, extract and work with the underlying data, or customize or develop new services. Open ecosystems have become an expected characteristic of modern technology. Google Apps enables companies and open source developers to offer apps which plug into Google’s offerings. Other examples include Salesforce, WordPress, or Drupal. Within the library sphere, the advent of the new genre of service platforms allows libraries to break away from legacy architectures to provide an open ecosystem of APIs for interoperability and extensibility. Libraries want to embrace open ecosystems to enable innovative new approaches to managing and providing access to collections, discovery, and services. Open environments can bring about radical change by harnessing the power of global participation, knowledge and talent. Libraries are opening and sharing access to collections and building more open and flexible spaces, but how can technology help us up our game and reimagine more open library ecosystems perhaps globally? Join us for thought-provoking conversations moderated by Marshall Breeding!



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